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WETA 8
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Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
WETA
Nov 5, 2012 10:00pm EST
against a wildly successful venture capitalist. >> we get a call from the boston police. and they say, "it's a mad scene down here." >> (chanting): we want ted! >> narrator: it was the night of their first debate. >> "we're going to have to get you an escort to get into the building." they had eight or ten motorcycle police officers there to guide us through the mobs of people at the site. >> narrator: it was 47-year-old mitt romney's first campaign. >> and mitt just has this big smile on his face, and he looks at me and goes, "boy, however this turns out, this really makes it worth it." >> narrator: the race had been close. romney needed a great performance. >> i don't think he had any idea what it was going to be like, because he had never done debates under that pressure. >> narrator: he'd gotten into the race because kennedy looked weak, beatable. >> at the time ted kennedy seemed vulnerable. it was a weak period for kennedy. he looked bad, he sounded bad, and in that way he was vulnerable. >> narrator: he was dramatically overweight. there had been trouble with alcohol and women. he'd
WETA
Nov 6, 2012 7:00pm EST
our colleague ray swawrers and hopefully we'll be joined by margaret warner in boston. ray is at the presidential candidate night headquarters in chicago. ray, what is the sense right now? when we talk about this ground game issue, what does the campaign say about what they have over the romney campaign in terms of ground game? >> they said this time instead of sending volunteers and sending field workers from state to state, they concentrated much more heavily on using people that people know. i mean it sounds kind of obvious. but all the research shows that when someone you know talks about you... talks to you about casting the vote in the first place or voting for the person you prefer, that has a lot more impact than somebody showing up at your door with paperwork, a leaflet or a pitch for a candidate. so they've put much more emphasis on having people work their own neighborhoods this time around. and they say they have hit their marks, that they are getting out their numbers. and so far so good. gwen? >> ifill: well, ray, i'm also curious. you're standing there at the
WETA
Nov 5, 2012 7:00pm EST
to victory. we hear from margaret warner with the romney campaign in boston and raw suarez at obama headquarters in chicago. >> it's the final frenetic day of the final campaign of his political career. the president ran from state to state starting in madson, wisconsin. the star power was kicked up a notch with an introduction from rock legend bruce springsteen. >> i get to fly around with him on the last day that i will ever campaign. that's not a bad way to end things. >> suarez: mr. obama called on his supporters not to be frustrated by the pace of change. instead, he encouraged them to send a message to those who blockedded his policies every step of the way. >> what they're counting on now is that you're going to be so worn down, so fed up, so tired of all the squabbling, so tired of all the dysfunction that you're just going to give up and walk away and leave them... leave them right where they are. pulling the strings, pulling the levers. and you locked out of the decisions that impact your lives. in other words, their bet is on cynicism. wisconsin, my bet is on you. >> suar
WETA
Nov 2, 2012 6:30pm EDT
at eaton vance management. he joins us from that firm in boston. duncan, i take it you're a pessimist in regards to avoiding the fiscal cliff that we're going to go over? >> not really a pessimist. i think the fiscal cliff is going to be more of a fiscal slope, but there will be a tax element to it. i think because we're starting at such a low level of tax rates, we're very likely to have higher taxes either immediately with the expiration of the payroll tax and potentially on capital gains and dividends in 2013 and beyond. >> tom: how should invests approach that, invest on what tax rates may be next year? >> not really. but there are great costs to be avoided by lessening the tax drag on your investment. positioning your portfolio and making sure you're in sthooks can outperform in a rising interest rate environment-- which is another thing we're worried about-- longer term makes some sense. >> tom: so rising interest rate environment, possibly higher inflation, higher taxes. not exactly the most shiny of forecasts for investors. >> well, there is something you can do about it. you
WETA
Oct 31, 2012 11:00pm EDT
to my former agency i think they absolutely would use them. >> rose: you just went to boston-- or to massachusetts to endorse elizabeth warren. >> yes. >> rose: who at one time thought might head up the consumer protection agency. that was not to be. >> right. >> rose: she wasn't even nominated by the president. >> right, right. >> rose: why did you endorse her? not that you shouldn't have, but why did you? >> she's my friend and i worked with her a lot. well, she was actually an advisory committee i set up at the f.d.i.c., to advicous consumer issues and how to make the banking system more accessible to lower income people. she was a tremendous help in that. and i worked with her when she became the chairman of the congressional oversight panel, nancy pelosi appointment, and we agreed a lot on some of the misuse of tarp funds. and when she became the special adviser to the consumer bureau, i was very supportive of the consumer bureau and tried to make sure the resources of the f.d.i.c. were there early on. we had several years of working together. we don't-- probably on fisc
WETA
Nov 1, 2012 11:30pm EDT
states over the last 20 years. these figures correspond to cities like new york, atlanta, dallas, boston, los angeles, and they indicate how in the early 1990's, late 1980's, there was a very significant increase in the homicide rates. we have homicide rates all the way up to 60, 40, something like that. mexico's current homicide rate you can see on this tight. >> rose: 100,000. >> the rate is at 24 and it has raised significantly over the last few years. what we have confronted is a increase in homicide rates not only in mexico but in all the hemisphere over the last few years. in the decade between 2000 and 2010 the homicide rate, the average homicide rate in all of the americas increased by 60%. so what we're doing in mexico is a fight for security. we are improving the rule of law. we are confronting these cartels, we're trying to bring them down, bring them to justice. we are transforming institutions devoted to the rule of law. and we are also going to the most vulnerable area of society to try to reconstruct the social fabric. of course we want to have much better results. >> ros
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)